Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Mounting Needlework Using Rustproof Straight Pins

Okay you have worked for hours on your counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or the needlework of your choice and of course you want to mount and frame it correctly. You have checked your wallet, took a peek in your husband's wallet, recheck the addition and subtraction of your check book, looked in the kids piggy banks and there is little to nothing there. So this means that you cannot afford to have a framer professionally frame your work of art. Since you have gone through this much work and feel your counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or needlework deserves to be framed as closely to acid free as possible, let me tell you how and where to get the supplies you will need to mount and frame your project the right way.

I know for some of you the only way to mount a piece of counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or the needlework of your choice is by lacing. At one point I would have whole heartly agreed but with the new materials being introduced to the market today, it is no longer a must.

You can start by going to your local fabric store and purchase Dritz Rustproof Silk Pins. Do not be tempted to use any other straight pins that are not marked Rustproof. Over time, these pins will rust and ruin your fabric. Next you can either go to your local Frame Shoppe, Michael's Arts & Crafts, or Hobby Lobby's Framing Departments and ask for 3/16" thick Acid Free Foam Core Board. You need to have the exact size of the finished counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or needlework of your choice before you can make this purchase. To get the exact size you will need, take the size of the stitch image and then add how much fabric you would like showing all around the stitch image, I like to give myself at least1 extra inch on all sides. (Stitch Image= The amount of Xs Left/Right and Up/Down) By having an inch on all four sides, only 3/4" of the fabric will be showing all the way around the stitch image, because 1/4" of that inch will be under the lip of the frame. To these measurements, give yourself at least 3 inches of fabric on all sides to wrap around to the back side of the 3/16" thick Acid Free Foam Core Board. In framing the sizing is very important, because this will be the measurements of the mounting board and the inside measurements of the frame you will be using to frame your project. An example would be, your exact stitching image is 5 X 5" and you want 1" exposure on all four sides, this would give you a 7 X 7" measurement for your mounting board and the inside measurements for your frame. You will want to purchase at least a 13 X 13 piece of Aida, Lugana, Evenweave, Linen or the fabric of your choice to stitch your pattern. When you are ready to mount your needlework, you will have 3" of extra fabric to wrap around each of the four sides. So for this example, you will want to purchase a 7 X 7" piece of 3/16" thick Acid Free Foam Core Board, as well as, a frame with the same inside measurements. Since you cannot afford to have your needlework conservation framed, try to have the enviroment inside the frame as acid free as possible. Try your best to get acid free materials whenever you possibly can.


To start, make sure that you have your finished piece of counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or the needlework of your choice clean. If you are sure the threads you have used will not bleed, you can wash your project piece in cold water and Woolite. Make sure you rinse your needlework very well, let dry and press out the wrinkles. You will want to trim off all the lose threads on the back of your needlework before you mount and frame your project. If you are using a light fabric, these loose threads could possibly be seen through the front of your finished needlework.

Center your needlework back side down on the 3/16" thick Acid Free Foam Core Board. Stand the mounting board on its edge, wrap the fabric to the backside of the mounting board and place a Rustproof pin in the center of the edge of the foam core board, see picture.












Going from the center out to each edge, placed a pin every 1/4".
Now go to the opposite side and pull the fabric taut but not so tightly that you bend the board. Make sure your stitch image is centered. Place a pin in the center of the opposite side and again add a pin every 1/4" until you reach each edge of the board. Your fingers will probably get a little sore doing this, so you may want to get the pin started and then find what ever you can to push the pins all the way flush with the fabric. As you can see, I am using aida in the picture and it can handle the pin without going through the fabric. With some of the thinner fabrics, the head of the pin could go all the way through the fabric. On thinner fabrics do not push the pins too deeply into the foam core. While I was placing all those pins into my project, I was eating Ice Breakers Tropical candy and since it is a round plastic container I pushed the pins in with the edge of the container and rolled the pins in place. I was surprised how nicely it worked. Just an idea to help your fingers. Continue with the other two sides until you have your needlework mounted.














Turn the mounted needlework over to the backside and if there is excessive material you can take the pins and pin the fabric to mounting board back. Just slide them in at an angle, making sure you do not go all the way through to the front of your needlework. Your back will not look like mine because I was using a piece of mounting board I had cut for another project I did not get around to finishing. I seem to do that quite a bit.












Now that you are finished mounting your counted cross stitch, punchneedle, embroidery, stitchery or the needlework of your choice, you are ready to frame your needlework. You can find framing instructions on my blog. You can pat yourself on the back for taking the time to preserve your heirloom for future generations. Happy Stitching!
www.homecraftframing.com

30 comments:

my tiny studio said...

Thank you very much for following me :)
you have some very interesting posts that I will be reading very soon .

Rafael

LeeHillPrimitives said...

Thanks for visit my blog and be one of my followers. Hope you enjoy your next visit. Love to have new blogging frineds. Your site looks nice and thank you for the mounting tutorial. Bye and see you soon.

Shelly said...

Thank you for visiting my blog and following it.

You have a very nice blog with great informative information & I am enjoying reading it.

Shel

Patti said...

Thanks for signing up to follow my blog. I was reading your's and you offer a great amount of information.
Patti

"B" said...

I just wanted to stop by to thank you for having signed on as a follower of my blog.

Nice tutorial on framing sstitcheries.

Lisa said...

Who knew candy could be so helpful! :)

Coralie Cederna Johnson said...

Thank you so much for the GREAT framing tips! I've signed on to follow your lovely blog!

ATTIC CLUTTER said...

Love the pumpkin picture (:) glad you came by and have a great day ok(:) hugs,Patty

Its So Very Cheri said...

Interesting post.

Thanks for following me. I will follow you as well.

cheri

BonjourRomance said...

I wanted to stop by and thank you for following my blog. You have a great blog, so many interesting and informative posts. I'll have a look around and will be back soon.
ENjoy a fabulous week!

Donatella said...

Needlework; seems to me such a talent, the concentration and the attention to detail is something I admire! Love the little post~

whyte said...

Thank you for such a great tutorial! Professional framing can be very expensive; I love this tip!

piggy said...

Thanks for stopping by for a visit. Enjoyed your blog...it reminded me of my first of just a few cross stitch projects that I have ever done. I was stationed at Fort Bragg. My roommate and her best friend did fantastic work so I thought I would give it a try...I still have it but never did frame it. Of course I did'nt know that I should choose an easy project!!! Now I just buy other people's fantastic projects at thrift shops.
Hogs & Kisses-piggy

Its So Very Cheri said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Melissa Miller said...

Thank you for visiting my blog and for following along as well! I really appreciate it and look forward to getting to know you better.

~Blessings, ~Melissa :)

All My Yesterdays said...

Glad to have you follow me! Came to see who you are and was amazed! I've done counted cross stitch for years but haven't done much for the past 2. Today I got a call from a lady I'd done something for a few years ago and she wants me to do a couple more. So now I'll dust off the needles (hehe) and get stitching again. I usually leave it up to people to frame their own. But now I know how to do mine! Thanks and I'll take time to learn more here and follow also.
Have a great weekend.

Vicki

Hootin' Anni said...

I love crafting and this was such a great post. I will follow your blog too....thanks for connecting with me and my blog by becoming a follower.

Six in One Hand said...

You have some very insightful points that I had forgotten about.
I used to work in the framing department at Michael's when I was in college a looooong time ago.

I love your site and will definitely be back!!

Mimi said...

HI!!!!
I will be back this week to read more, in the process of painting a few rooms, not me but it is still alot of work!!! With a toddler grand baby here part of the time!!!!haha
thanks so much for stopping by!!!
jamie

Karen said...

Love the pumpkin stitchery!

Frenchy chick said...

That is so cute!!! You are super talented. I tried few years ago to stitch. Sad story..LOL.
I appreciate your talent and i love pumpkins.

Sherrie said...

Thank you. Your instructions obviously took a long time to write, such thoughtfulness in your detail. Thank you for providing the tutorial. I also wanted to say hello, nice to meet you and welcome to my blog. I love meeting new faces. I look forward to future chats.

Maggie May said...

Sweet!! And I love the name Bailey- I have a cousin with that name.

FrenchGardenHouse said...

Thanks so much! An excellent explaination, one I am filing for future reference. :) Lidy

ODD imagination said...

I have several friends that love to do cross stitch and embroidery. I am going to have to direct them to your lovely blog!
Thank you for following on my blog.
:o)

Parsley said...

Thanks for following me too! I'm excited to learn about your crafting solutions.

Amy aka: ropergirl3 said...

what a great article!

ladyhawthorne said...

Thank you for this information. I was a picture framer for many years but have not kept up with new things since I no longer work in the picture framing business.

jayne@~an eye for threads~ said...

As I do my own framing and I still maintain that the lacing is the way to go for me but I do know of many whom choose pinning their work and it looks as nice. I tend to be the one that everyone comes to from our stitching group for assistance in their final presentation of their work. A nice feeling when people enjoy the final outcome and being a part of that process is a nice warm fuzzy.
Great tutorial and deail.
Be always in stitches.

Burnt Woods Creator said...

Okay, You rock my dear framing friend. How many times have I done exactly what you say about wanting to have it done professionally but the funds just aren't there. I have done quite a bit of framing but not with my cross stitch only my paintings. Thank you so much for the in depth instructions. They will be so helpful to me since I am on a fixed income with the exception of a few small sale of my creations. Thanks again